[Footballing] Blackness in a White Nation: Uruguay vs Brazil, 1913

In August 1913, Montevideo hosted a Brazilian football team for the first time when a combined São Paulo league side toured the Río de la Plata. While the first official Uruguay-Brazil international match took place in 1916, the Paulista visit was no less significant. Upon the arrival of the São Paulo delegation, a Montevideo daily was … Continue reading [Footballing] Blackness in a White Nation: Uruguay vs Brazil, 1913

African professionals? Uruguay’s Black stars of the 1916 Copa America

Uruguay went into the 1916 Campeonato Sudamericano in Buenos Aires seeking not only redemption, but reaffirmation. Of course, they there to avenge the humiliating 4-1 defeat suffered against Argentina at the Revolución de Mayo tournament six years earlier. More importantly, however, the tournament was an opportunity for Uruguay to measure both their progress as a nation … Continue reading African professionals? Uruguay’s Black stars of the 1916 Copa America

The 1909 Tottenham-Everton tour of the River Plate

Uruguayans always looked to the British. Since those early days in the open spaces of Punta Carretas, the Uruguayan’s relationship with the game of the ‘crazy English’ evolved from curiosity, to admiration, to imitation. Given the opportunity, the Uruguayan took the game and made it their own. They say from there developed that famous, home-grown … Continue reading The 1909 Tottenham-Everton tour of the River Plate

John Harley: the Scot who transformed Uruguayan football

I trusted everything Eduardo Galeano wrote about football. I still do. His writing was as authoritative as it was beautiful. He told us about those crazy English, who brought their exclusive game to Buenos Aires and Montevideo, and those lowly Creoles, who seized the pastime of the elite and made it their own. The Creoles invented el toque, … Continue reading John Harley: the Scot who transformed Uruguayan football